Union effectiveness: Listen and lead, says Rhonda Johnson

By Rhonda Johnson
President, Columbus (Ohio) Education Association

I entered teaching in 1978 at the culmination of one of the stormiest periods in Ohio labor history. I’ve seen the struggle up close. I also have seen progress born from a willingness to sit down and talk, to reframe questions, to listen to the answers and to compromise.

Much of this work began with my mentor, the late John Grossman, Columbus Education Association president for 26 years. When I earned election to that post in 2004, I inherited his spirit of integrity and a talented staff

Education unions should tackle what we care about: working (and learning) conditions, says Kevin Welner

At a time when the nation’s policy makers have been counter-productively attempting to manipulate educators with enticements and threats, it’s important to remember the research that shows educators to be most responsive to working

Union capacity building will move vision forward, says Dennis Van Roekel

By Dennis Van Roekel
President, NEA


At the heart of education reform is the teachers union's relationship to students, parents, and community. We strive to lead our professions because it is a path to improve public schools – for our children and our communities. Regardless

Huffington Post Blog: It's About Time: Promising Efforts to Improve Our Schools With Right Amount of Time

By Harriet Sanford
President & CEO
The NEA Foundation



"We all know that the time educators spend in the classroom is just the tip of the iceberg. Grading papers, working with students before and after the bell rings, staff meetings and parent conferences -- these all add to the school day in ways that

NEA Foundation Report: One step toward blowing up back-end accountability

By Michael Fullan
Professor Emeritus, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto; Member, The NEA Foundation Senior Fellows Advisory Group

Jal Mehta drew a deeply insightful conclusion about the teaching profession in his book, "The Allure of Order," when he observed that policy makers are doing with accountability at the back end what they should have done with capacity building at

"Keep Austin Wired" with the NEA Foundation’s online courses

By Jesse Graytock
Grants Manager

The motto of Austin, Texas, home of the 2013 National Council of Urban Education Associations’ fall conference, is “Keep Austin Weird.” On a recent (and unusually frigid) December morning, a group of educators representing

Huffington Post Blog: Sense and Sustainability in Education Reform

By Harriet Sanford
President & CEO
The NEA Foundation



"It's a question that's daunted educators for decades: Why haven't well-intentioned efforts to improve teaching and learning in our schools had the kind of impact we want and need? It's often called a failure of bringing reform to scale, but in

The unfulfilled promise of excellence and equity


This is the second of three posts discussing themes and issues explored during the NEA Foundation’s 7th annual Union-District Convening, held Oct. 24-25 in Washington, D.C.


As 19 district-union teams from school districts around the nation

Public education at a crossroads


This is the first of three posts discussing themes and issues explored during the NEA Foundation’s 7th annual Union-District Convening, held Oct. 24-25 in Washington, D.C.


Former U.S. Secretary of Education Richard Riley—a key architect

Watch live stream of national education thought leaders on Oct. 24-25


Watch NEA President Dennis Van Roekel
speak at last year’s event.

 

Some of the nation’s most prominent education thought leaders— from Dennis Van Roekel, president of the NEA, to Richard Riley, former U.S. Secretary of

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Join us on February 10, 2017!

Educators from across the country traded their classrooms for a night on stage, where they were honored by more than 850 national education leaders and supporters in Washington, D.C.

 

Did you attend? Now, you can purchase photos from the evening.

 

 

Celebrating 42 educators from across the country

It is our pleasure to distinguish these extraordinary educators with the 2016 California Casualty Awards for Teaching Excellence. These prestigious awards recognize, reward, and promote excellence in teaching and advocacy for the profession. All deserve our recognition and sincere thanks, but we had to choose one for our highest honor.

 

And the award goes to...

Photo: Esai Morales, award-winning actor and gala host; Harriet Sanford, President and CEO of the NEA Foundation; Debra McDonald; Gary Phoebus, President and CEO of NEA Member Benefits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the evening’s finale, Debra McDonald, an early childhood education instructor at Wayne County Schools Career Center in Smithville, Ohio, took home the top honor: the NEA Member Benefits Award for Teaching Excellence and $25,000! 

 

Watch Debra McDonald’s acceptance speech below.

 

 

Five educators receive top awards

Photo: Dirk Andrews, Horace Mann Awards for Teaching Excellence recipient (WY); Pam Wells, Horace Mann Awards for Teaching Excellence recipient (SD); Debra McDonald, Horace Mann Awards for Teaching Excellence recipient (OH); Crystal Brown, The NEA Foundation Board Chair; Lily Eskelsen Garcia, NEA President; Heather LaBarbara, Horace Mann Awards for Teaching Excellence recipient (KY); Mohsen Ghaffari, Horace Mann Awards for Teaching Excellence recipient (UT)

 

 

 

 

Of the 42 educators honored that night, five also accepted the 2016 Horace Mann Awards for Teaching Excellence and $10,000, as finalists for the evening’s top honor. Their students could not be more proud of them!

 

Watch all five videos, which premiered during the gala, that students created using iPads to honor their award-winning educators.

 

Harriet Sanford shares story of hearing from former student—40 years later

Watch Harriet Sanford, the NEA Foundation's President and CEO, share a heartfelt story about a blast from her past — a text message she received from a student she taught 40 years ago — below.

 

 

Hispanic Scholarship Fund honored

Photo: Harriet Sanford, President and CEO of the NEA Foundation; Esai Morales, award-winning actor and gala host; Crystal Brown, NEA Foundation Board Chair; Fidel A. Vargas, President and CEO of  the Hispanic Scholarship Fund; Stephen Eulie, Executive Vice President of Consumer Banking, First National Bank of Omaha

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The NEA Foundation also presented the Hispanic Scholarship Fund with the First National Bank of Omaha Award for Outstanding Service to Public Education, paying tribute to their distribution of more than $470 million dollars in scholarships Latino college-bound students since 1975.

 

This award recognizes individuals and organizations for their lifelong commitment to advancing public education and is typically presented to those who work outside the field. Awardees have included former President Bill Clinton, Title IX advocate Billie Jean King, and Sesame Workshop.

 

Watch Fidel A. Vargas, President and CEO, accept the award of the behalf of Hispanic Scholarship Fund below.

 

 

With host, actor and activist Esai Morales

Photo: Esai Morales, award-winning actor and self-described "actorvist," reads tweets from the audience live on stage: "@MarkMautone: @Esai_Morales you rocked it! Thank you for supporting educators."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This year, Esai Morales, an accomplished actor who appeared in the biopic “La Bamba,” the HBO Series, “The Brink,” and the television series “NYPD Blue” and “Criminal Minds,” served as charismatic emcee and host. Morales cofounded the National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts, following in the activist footsteps of his mother, who was an organizer for the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union.

 

That night, he led guests and those watching the live stream from home or at viewing parties in cheering on the night’s biggest stars.

 

Special guests take the stage

Photo: Students from the Young People's Chorus of New York City, which now has 1,400 students from New York, ages 7 to 18, participate annually.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With students at the center of public education, a group of English Language Learner students, who participated in a NEA Foundation-funded, high school theater program in Annandale, Virginia, also took center stage to perform Shakespeare. The Young People's Chorus of New York City wowed audiences with renditions from "The Sound of Music," and audiences also enjoyed the music and dance of Furia Flamenca and Torcuato Zamora, an accomplished flamenco guitarist from Spain.

 

Watch the Young People's Chorus of New York City perform the evening's finale below.

 

 

A special thank you to all who helped us celebrate the best in public education! Save the date for next year’s gala on February 10, 2017.