Global Learning Fellowship

The NEA Foundation recognizes that in order for students to prepare for the global age, the educator must first be equipped with the knowledge, skills and disposition needed to teach in the global age. By participating in the Global Learning Fellowship program, educators have an opportunity to lead the profession by acquiring the necessary skills to integrate global competence into their daily classroom instruction, advance pedagogy in their school/district, prepare students to thrive in the flattened global age, and thus contribute to the closing of the global achievement gap.

On June 20-28, 2014, 30 award-winning public school educators travelled to China to observe high-quality instruction and to interact with Chinese teachers and administrators in Beijing and Xi’an schools as our latest cohort of Global Learning Fellows.

 

The international field study was part of a year-long fellowship and supported learning experience in which educators built global competency skills.


Over the course of one year, these educators explored the knowledge, skills, and disposition required to prepare their students for the global age. To do so, they investigated the world beyond their immediate environment, recognized multiple perspectives, and communicated ideas effectively with diverse audiences. Learn more about the program with these FAQs.


 

What is involved in the year-long fellowship?

 

  • Readings and webinars to introduce global competence and country specific concepts;
  • Online coursework on global competence, country specific concepts, and interactive language learning;
  • Basic Mandarin language learning with Rosetta Stone;
  • A two-day professional development workshop with sessions led by leaders in global competency and country-specific knowledge; and
  • An international field study designed to focus on the themes of global competence, education (both practice and issues of international, national, and state policy) and economics.

Global lesson plans on BetterLesson.com

Later in the year, fellows will be tasked with integrating global competence into their daily classroom instruction, beginning with the creation of a lesson plan, unit plan, or full curriculum.


Now, educators from around the world can access 2013 NEA Foundation Global Learning Fellows’ plans via an open-source platform, BetterLesson.com.

 

Discover dozens of global lesson plans created by previous fellows that can easily be replicated.

 

Download global lesson plans now.

 

 

What makes a lesson plan “global”?

“Prior to this I had believed teaching multicultural texts was enough to prepare my students for the modern world. I finally realized how much of my material was focused on the American perspective."

 

Karen Toavs, 2013 NEA Foundation Global Learning Fellow and North Dakota Education Association member

"I designed “The Power of Homelands” as my first unit introducing the challenges of global citizenship to students in my world literature class. This mini unit introduces diaspora literature, exploring the struggles and experiences of those populations displaced from their homelands. … I felt I would need time to establish students’ feelings about their own homes, build empathetic conversation about the importance of homes, and reveal current global problems related to population displacement. After establishing these foundations, I would then be able to launch into compelling world literature, connecting students to many global issues throughout the term.”

 

 

 

 

“Our group arrived as political unrest unfolded in Brazil, and we were able to interact with Brazilian students and teachers who participated in those events."


 

Josh Stumpenhorst, 2013 NEA Foundation Global Learning Fellow and Illinois Education Association member

"In thinking about designing my unit plan, “Global Unrest,” I wanted to bring the experiences I had in South America into my classroom and make that connection.

 

As a social science teacher, it is far too easy to get wrapped up in dates and facts while losing sight of the human struggle often underlying these events.

 

When we talk about the Roman Plebeians rebelling for their rights and equal treatment, I want students to think of the Brazilians I met and their struggle.” 

FAQs

The Global Learning Fellowship program, now in its fourth year, is a professional development opportunity that contributes to the development of increased global competency for educators and students. It is designed to help educators, all recipients of the NEA Foundation’s Award for Teaching Excellence, acquire the necessary skills to integrate global competence into their daily classroom instruction, and prepare students to thrive in the interconnected global age.

In 2010, the NEA Foundation designed a cultural and educational exploration program to enhance the teaching and learning experience for the NEA Foundation’s Awards for Teaching Excellence recipients, which resulted in an international field study to China. At the conclusion, we realized this was more than just cultural exploration; it was an opportunity to deepen educators’ understanding of the skills they and their students will need to be successful in the interconnected global economy. Over the years, the program has evolved to include an intentional focus and understanding of the global competencies students need.

Global competency is an intentional focus on and understanding of:

  • Investigating the world beyond one’s immediate environment;
  • Recognizing multiple perspectives;
  • Communicating ideas effectively with diverse audiences; and
  • Taking action to improve conditions.

 

The NEA Foundation believes that in order for students to prepare for the global age, the educator must first be equipped with the knowledge, skills and disposition needed to teach in the global age. The Global Learning Fellowship program expands on the NEA Foundation’s mission to advance student achievement by investing in public education that will prepare all students to learn and thrive in a rapidly changing world.

Over the course of one year, Fellows are supported by the NEA Foundation staff, partners, and other field experts, as they work through the following:

  • Readings and webinars to introduce global competence and country specific concepts;
  • Online coursework on global competence, country specific concepts, and interactive language learning;
  • A two-day professional development workshop with sessions led by leaders in global competency and country-specific knowledge; and
  • An international field study designed to focus on the themes of global competence, education (both practice and issues of international, national, and state policy) and economics.

In 2014, Fellows will tour China, from June 20-30. Visits to schools in Beijing and Xi'an are designed to provide educators with structured opportunities to observe classroom instruction and to interact with teachers and administrators. Fellows will also have opportunities to investigate China’s historical and cultural significance.

Fellows will complete an online course to provide them with a framework to contextualize their experiences in China by examining the impact of its historical and cultural legacies on contemporary society and educational system.

At the conclusion of the Fellowship, educators begin working on a final project to create a lesson plan, unit plan, or full curriculum integrated with global competency skills. By creating this plan, and then sharing with educators around the world via an open source platform, Fellows are contributing to an increasing field of knowledge on this topic. Furthermore, the Fellows become positioned to lead the profession by becoming advocates for global learning and global competence within their schools, communities, and districts.

The 2013 NEA Foundation Global Learning Fellows represent 36 states and teach at the elementary, middle or high school level. From June 20-27, 2013, Fellows participated in an international field study to São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

 

While in Brazil, Fellows visited schools in to observe classroom instruction and to interact with Brazilian teachers and administrators; they also had opportunities to investigate Brazil’s rich historical and cultural landmarks.

 

Read our series, “Blogging from Brazil” to learn about their experiences.

 

 

 

Blogging from Brazil: We Arrive in Sao Paulo

 

 

 

 

Blogging from Brazil: Stepping into Sao Paulo Classrooms 

 

 

 

 

Blogging from Brazil: Rio de Janeiro School Visits 

 

 

 

 

Blogging from Brazil: “The Culture of Our Most Vulnerable Students” 

 

 

 

 

Blogging from Brazil: “What Happens When You Take 35 Teachers to Brazil to Study Schools and Culture? Magic.”


 

Meet the 2015 Global Learning Fellows